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Top speed formel 1

top speed formel 1

8. Sept. Das Red-Bull-Juniorteam Toro Rosso ist bekannt dafür, keine Angst davor zu haben, in der Formel 1 andere Wege zu gehen als die anderen. Nov. In der Saison wird die Topspeedjagd in der Formel 1 übrigens vorläufig ein Ende haben: Durch die breiteren Fahrzeuge steigt der. Zudem hält dieser mit ,6 Stundenkilometern auch den Rekord für den höchsten Top-Speed, der mit einem Formel 1 Wagen je erreicht wurde. Allerdings war. Toro Wetttip Jetzt einkaufen. Fat cats adrivo Sportpresse GmbH sucht in Festanstellung: Weil die Maximalgeschwindigkeit verschiedene Faktoren beeinflussen können. Aber nur mit Valtteri Bottas. Um offiziell beglaubigt zu werden, verlangt die FIA zwei Läufe auf der gleichen Strecke — einmal hin, einmal zurück. Testen Sie hier Ihr F1-Fachwissen! Ferrari scheint in Sachen Maximal-Power nicht weit von Mercedes entfernt. Alonso 50 kompletter WM-Stand. Hallmark casino no deposit bonus codes 2019 FormelTechnik mit Giorgio Piola. Dazu den jeweils besten Wert auf Beste Spielothek in Segger finden Zielstrich. Motorsport Network Tickets kaufen Shop. Folge war der schwere Crash des Schweden mit mehreren Überschlägen. Für Aufsehen sorgte aber ein Bestwert aus Baku: Man kann leicht falsch liegen in seinen Schlussfolgerungen.

formel top 1 speed -

Wir zeigen Ihnen die Bilder des Tages in der Galerie Formel 1 McLaren bestätigt Verpflichtung von Key. Zunächst kamen wir nicht mal über den ersten Gang hinaus! Die meisten Salzspezialisten arbeiten mit einer Handvoll Kumpels. Formel 1 Fahrer müssen hungern: Insoweit findet seitdem kein Wettbewerb verschiedener Hersteller mehr statt. Wie schnell könnte ein FormelRenner wirklich fahren? Seit der Saison gibt es nur noch jeweils einen Reifenhersteller, der allen Teams Reifen zur Verfügung stellt. Force India ist das Gegenteil.

After technical challenges from other teams, it was withdrawn after a single race. Rule changes then followed to limit the benefits of 'ground effects' - firstly a ban on the skirts used to contain the low pressure area, later a requirement for a 'stepped floor'.

Despite the full-sized wind tunnels and vast computing power used by the aerodynamic departments of most teams, the fundamental principles of Formula One aerodynamics still apply: The primary wings mounted on the front and rear are fitted with different profiles depending on the downforce requirements of a particular track.

Tight, slow circuits like Monaco require very aggressive wing profiles - you will see that cars run two separate 'blades' of 'elements' on the rear wings two is the maximum permitted.

In contrast, high-speed circuits like Monza see the cars stripped of as much wing as possible, to reduce drag and increase speed on the long straights.

Every single surface of a modern Formula One car, from the shape of the suspension links to that of the driver's helmet - has its aerodynamic effects considered.

Disrupted air, where the flow 'separates' from the body, creates turbulence which creates drag - which slows the car down. Look at a recent car and you will see that almost as much effort has been spent reducing drag as increasing downforce - from the vertical end-plates fitted to wings to prevent vortices forming to the diffuser plates mounted low at the back, which help to re-equalise pressure of the faster-flowing air that has passed under the car and would otherwise create a low-pressure 'balloon' dragging at the back.

Despite this, designers can't make their cars too 'slippery', as a good supply of airflow has to be ensured to help dissipate the vast amounts of heat produced by the engine and brakes.

In recent years, most Formula One teams have tried to emulate Ferrari's 'narrow waist' design, where the rear of the car is made as narrow and low as possible.

This reduces drag and maximises the amount of air available to the rear wing. The 'barge boards' fitted to the sides of cars have also helped to shape the flow of the air and minimise the amount of turbulence.

Revised regulations introduced in forced the aerodynamicists to be even more ingenious. In a bid to cut speeds, the FIA robbed the cars of a chunk of downforce by raising the front wing, bringing the rear wing forward, and modifying the rear diffuser profile.

The designers quickly clawed back much of the loss, with a variety of intricate and novel solutions such as the 'horn' winglets first seen on the McLaren MP Most of those innovations were effectively outlawed under even more stringent aero regulations imposed by the FIA for The changes were designed to promote overtaking by making it easier for a car to closely follow another.

The new rules took the cars into another new era, with lower and wider front wings, taller and narrower rear wings, and generally much 'cleaner' bodywork.

Perhaps the most interesting change, however, was the introduction of 'moveable aerodynamics', with the driver able to make limited adjustments to the front wing from the cockpit during a race.

This too allows drivers to make adjustments, but the system's availability is electronically governed - originally it could be used at any time in practice and qualifying unless a driver is on wet-weather tyres , but during the race, it could only be activated when a driver is less than one second behind another car at pre-determined points on the track.

From DRS is available only at the pre-determined points during all sessions. The system is then deactivated once the driver brakes.

The system "stalls" the rear wing by opening a flap, which leaves a 50mm horizontal gap in the wing, thus massively reducing drag and allowing higher top speeds.

However, this also reduces downforce so it is normally used on longer straight track sections or sections which do not require high downforce.

The system was introduced to promote more overtaking and is often the reason for overtaking on straights or at the end of straights where overtaking is encouraged in the following corner s.

However, the reception of the DRS system has differed among drivers, fans, and specialists. Former Formula 1 driver Robert Kubica has been quoted of saying he "has not seen any overtaking moves in Formula 1 for two years", [ citation needed ] suggesting that the DRS is an unnatural way to pass cars on track as it does not actually require driver skill to successfully overtake a competitor, therefore, it would not be overtaking.

The use of aerodynamics to increase the cars' grip was pioneered in Formula One in the late s by Lotus , Ferrari and Brabham.

Early designs linked wings directly to the suspension, but several accidents led to rules stating that wings must be fixed rigidly to the chassis.

The cars' aerodynamics are designed to provide maximum downforce with a minimum of drag ; every part of the bodywork is designed with this aim in mind.

Like most open-wheel cars they feature large front and rear aerofoils , but they are far more developed than American open-wheel racers, which depend more on suspension tuning; for instance, the nose is raised above the centre of the front aerofoil, allowing its entire width to provide downforce.

The front and rear wings are highly sculpted and extremely fine 'tuned', along with the rest of the body such as the turning vanes beneath the nose, bargeboards , sidepods, underbody, and the rear diffuser.

They also feature aerodynamic appendages that direct the airflow. Such an extreme level of aerodynamic development means that an F1 car produces much more downforce than any other open-wheel formula; Indycars, for example, produce downforce equal to their weight that is, a downforce: The bargeboards in particular are designed, shaped, configured, adjusted and positioned not to create downforce directly, as with a conventional wing or underbody venturi, but to create vortices from the air spillage at their edges.

The use of vortices is a significant feature of the latest breeds of F1 cars. Since a vortex is a rotating fluid that creates a low pressure zone at its centre, creating vortices lowers the overall local pressure of the air.

Since low pressure is what is desired under the car, as it allows normal atmospheric pressure to press the car down from the top; by creating vortices, downforce can be augmented while still staying within the rules prohibiting ground effects.

The F1 cars for the season came under much questioning due to the design of the rear diffusers of the Williams, Toyota and the Brawn GP cars raced by Jenson Button and Rubens Barrichello, dubbed double diffusers.

Appeals from many of the teams were heard by the FIA, which met in Paris, before the Chinese Grand Prix and the use of such diffusers was declared as legal.

Brawn GP boss Ross Brawn claimed the double diffuser design as "an innovative approach of an existing idea". These were subsequently banned for the season.

Another controversy of the and '11 seasons was the front wing of the Red Bull cars. Several teams protested claiming the wing was breaking regulations.

Footage from high speed sections of circuits showed the Red Bull front wing bending on the outsides subsequently creating greater downforce.

Tests were held on the Red Bull front wing and the FIA could find no way that the wing was breaking any regulation. Since the start of the season, cars have been allowed to run with an adjustable rear wing, more commonly known as DRS drag reduction system , a system to combat the problem of turbulent air when overtaking.

On the straights of a track, drivers can deploy DRS, which opens the rear wing, reduces the drag of the car, allowing it to move faster.

As soon as the driver touches the brake, the rear wing shuts again. In free practice and qualifying, a driver may use it whenever he wishes to, but in the race, it can only be used if the driver is 1 second, or less, behind another driver at the DRS detection zone on the race track, at which point it can be activated in the activation zone until the driver brakes.

F1 regulations heavily limit the use of ground effect aerodynamics which are a highly efficient means of creating downforce with a small drag penalty.

The underside of the vehicle, the undertray, must be flat between the axles. A substantial amount of downforce is provided by using a rear diffuser which rises from the undertray at the rear axle to the actual rear of the bodywork.

The limitations on ground effects, limited size of the wings requiring use at high angles of attack to create sufficient downforce , and vortices created by open wheels lead to a high aerodynamic drag coefficient about 1 according to Minardi 's technical director Gabriele Tredozi ; [18] compare with the average modern saloon car , which has a C d value between 0.

However, this drag is more than compensated for by the ability to corner at extremely high speed. The aerodynamics are adjusted for each track; with a low drag configuration for tracks where high speed is more important like Autodromo Nazionale Monza , and a high traction configuration for tracks where cornering is more important, like the Circuit de Monaco.

With the regulations, the FIA rid F1 cars of small winglets and other parts of the car minus the front and rear wing used to manipulate the airflow of the car in order to decrease drag and increase downforce.

As it is now, the front wing is shaped specifically to push air towards all the winglets and bargeboards so that the airflow is smooth.

Should these be removed, various parts of the car will cause great drag when the front wing is unable to shape the air past the body of the car.

The driver has the ability to fine-tune many elements of the race car from within the machine using the steering wheel. The wheel can be used to change gears, apply rev.

Data such as engine rpm, lap times, speed, and gear are displayed on an LCD screen. The wheel hub will also incorporate gear change paddles and a row of LED shift lights.

In the season, certain teams such as Mercedes have chosen to use larger LCDs on their wheels which allow the driver to see additional information such as fuel flow and torque delivery.

They are also more customizable owing to the possibility of using much different software. The fuel used in F1 cars is fairly similar to ordinary petrol , albeit with a far more tightly controlled mix.

Formula One fuel can only contain compounds that are found in commercial gasoline, in contrast to alcohol-based fuels used in American open-wheel racing.

Blends are tuned for maximum performance in given weather conditions or different circuits. During the period when teams were limited to a specific volume of fuel during a race, exotic high-density fuel blends were used which were actually more dense than water, since the energy content of a fuel depends on its mass density.

To make sure that the teams and fuel suppliers are not violating the fuel regulations, the FIA requires Elf, Shell, Mobil, Petronas and the other fuel teams to submit a sample of the fuel they are providing for a race.

At any time, FIA inspectors can request a sample from the fueling rig to compare the "fingerprint" of what is in the car during the race with what was submitted.

The teams usually abide by this rule, but in , Mika Häkkinen was stripped of his third-place finish at Spa-Francorchamps in Belgium after the FIA determined that his fuel was not the correct formula, as well as in , both McLaren and Penske cars were forced to the rear of the Italian Grand Prix after the octane number of the mixture was found to be too high.

The season saw the re-introduction of slick tyres replacing the grooved tyres used from to Unlike the fuel, the tyres bear only a superficial resemblance to a normal road tyre.

Newly-reconfigured Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez in Mexico City replaced Monza as the temple of top speed in , with the high altitudes of 2,m above sea level, producing highest recorded season-high velocities, Pastor Maldonado's staggering Second on the list was Sebastian Vettel with And then at new Baku Azerbaijan Formula 1 city track produced record top speeds at the end of the straight.

This figure is in excess of speed trap figures from F1's other high-speed venues, Mexico and Monza. Baku's top speeds are more of a shock because of the tight and twisty nature of the city track once the cars have left the 2.

The car was optimized for top speed with only enough downforce to prevent it from leaving the ground. On this occasion the car did not fully meet FIA Formula One regulations, as it used a moveable aerodynamic rudder for stability control, breaching article 3.

The acceleration figure is usually 2. With the exception of the driver adjustable bodywork described in Article 3. Any device or construction that is designed to bridge the gap between the sprung part of the car and the ground is prohibited under all circumstances.

No part having an aerodynamic influence and no part of the bodywork, with the exception of the skid block in 3. It's tempting to think that it might be like when Frodo puts on the Ring of Power, and everything goes all weird.

Supposing the God of the Catholic church really existed, the doctrine is that he exists outside of time; so all time would be simultaneously present to such a being if present is the right word to use , and he would see all of it.

That's about the most radical form of omniscience I can think of. There's a temporal dimension for more worldly inhabitants like us, but I'm not sure it follows that because our sensory appendages and brain structures condition and limit perceptions, that there is a definitive what-it's-like-ness to the world, outside of our experiences of it.

Our perception of reality is reality. There is no seat in the universe in which one can sit or device you can use, to see the "real" reality. It is entirely relative.

Over the coming decades we'll begin to see transhumanism and machine augmentation that will give us new perspectives on reality. But the perspective we currently have is good enough to have allowed us to become the world's dominant species.

It was in , according to my Curious History of Food and Drink to be published this autumn by Quercus that John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich , found himself so loathe to leave the card table to dine that he had his servant put a piece of cold beef between two slices of bread — so creating what became known as the sandwich.

So goes the commonly told story, but Sandwich was not such an inveterate gambler, and indeed his biographer NAM Rodger suggests that, busy politician and patron of the arts that he was, Sandwich may well have ordered the first sandwich so that he could eat at his desk.

But Sandwich's sandwich was not, in fact, the first sandwich. So the first sandwich filling was not a slice of beef, but a buttered banknote.

The retired Pope's infallibility. Readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts.

Presse soll mehr Respekt zeigen mehr. Der Sieger bekam damals so viele Punkte wie heute der Sechstplatzierte eines Rennens. Wo lag das gemessen an den bisherigen Speed-Rekorden? Folge war der schwere Crash des Schweden mit mehreren Überschlägen. Die meisten siebten Plätze [A 2]. Das hätten die F1-Piloten wohl gerne. Formel 1 Force India: Allerdings war dies in keiner Wettbewerbsfahrt, weshalb er nicht als der generelle Bestwert zählt. Die Räder drehten auf dem Salz zu stark durch, und die elektronische Steuereinheit riegelte ab. So sieht der Stufenplan ab aus. Diesen Titel müssen sich Deutschland und Italien teilen:

Such an extreme level of aerodynamic development means that an F1 car produces much more downforce than any other open-wheel formula; Indycars, for example, produce downforce equal to their weight that is, a downforce: The bargeboards in particular are designed, shaped, configured, adjusted and positioned not to create downforce directly, as with a conventional wing or underbody venturi, but to create vortices from the air spillage at their edges.

The use of vortices is a significant feature of the latest breeds of F1 cars. Since a vortex is a rotating fluid that creates a low pressure zone at its centre, creating vortices lowers the overall local pressure of the air.

Since low pressure is what is desired under the car, as it allows normal atmospheric pressure to press the car down from the top; by creating vortices, downforce can be augmented while still staying within the rules prohibiting ground effects.

The F1 cars for the season came under much questioning due to the design of the rear diffusers of the Williams, Toyota and the Brawn GP cars raced by Jenson Button and Rubens Barrichello, dubbed double diffusers.

Appeals from many of the teams were heard by the FIA, which met in Paris, before the Chinese Grand Prix and the use of such diffusers was declared as legal.

Brawn GP boss Ross Brawn claimed the double diffuser design as "an innovative approach of an existing idea".

These were subsequently banned for the season. Another controversy of the and '11 seasons was the front wing of the Red Bull cars.

Several teams protested claiming the wing was breaking regulations. Footage from high speed sections of circuits showed the Red Bull front wing bending on the outsides subsequently creating greater downforce.

Tests were held on the Red Bull front wing and the FIA could find no way that the wing was breaking any regulation.

Since the start of the season, cars have been allowed to run with an adjustable rear wing, more commonly known as DRS drag reduction system , a system to combat the problem of turbulent air when overtaking.

On the straights of a track, drivers can deploy DRS, which opens the rear wing, reduces the drag of the car, allowing it to move faster.

As soon as the driver touches the brake, the rear wing shuts again. In free practice and qualifying, a driver may use it whenever he wishes to, but in the race, it can only be used if the driver is 1 second, or less, behind another driver at the DRS detection zone on the race track, at which point it can be activated in the activation zone until the driver brakes.

F1 regulations heavily limit the use of ground effect aerodynamics which are a highly efficient means of creating downforce with a small drag penalty.

The underside of the vehicle, the undertray, must be flat between the axles. A substantial amount of downforce is provided by using a rear diffuser which rises from the undertray at the rear axle to the actual rear of the bodywork.

The limitations on ground effects, limited size of the wings requiring use at high angles of attack to create sufficient downforce , and vortices created by open wheels lead to a high aerodynamic drag coefficient about 1 according to Minardi 's technical director Gabriele Tredozi ; [18] compare with the average modern saloon car , which has a C d value between 0.

However, this drag is more than compensated for by the ability to corner at extremely high speed. The aerodynamics are adjusted for each track; with a low drag configuration for tracks where high speed is more important like Autodromo Nazionale Monza , and a high traction configuration for tracks where cornering is more important, like the Circuit de Monaco.

With the regulations, the FIA rid F1 cars of small winglets and other parts of the car minus the front and rear wing used to manipulate the airflow of the car in order to decrease drag and increase downforce.

As it is now, the front wing is shaped specifically to push air towards all the winglets and bargeboards so that the airflow is smooth.

Should these be removed, various parts of the car will cause great drag when the front wing is unable to shape the air past the body of the car.

The driver has the ability to fine-tune many elements of the race car from within the machine using the steering wheel.

The wheel can be used to change gears, apply rev. Data such as engine rpm, lap times, speed, and gear are displayed on an LCD screen. The wheel hub will also incorporate gear change paddles and a row of LED shift lights.

In the season, certain teams such as Mercedes have chosen to use larger LCDs on their wheels which allow the driver to see additional information such as fuel flow and torque delivery.

They are also more customizable owing to the possibility of using much different software. The fuel used in F1 cars is fairly similar to ordinary petrol , albeit with a far more tightly controlled mix.

Formula One fuel can only contain compounds that are found in commercial gasoline, in contrast to alcohol-based fuels used in American open-wheel racing.

Blends are tuned for maximum performance in given weather conditions or different circuits. During the period when teams were limited to a specific volume of fuel during a race, exotic high-density fuel blends were used which were actually more dense than water, since the energy content of a fuel depends on its mass density.

To make sure that the teams and fuel suppliers are not violating the fuel regulations, the FIA requires Elf, Shell, Mobil, Petronas and the other fuel teams to submit a sample of the fuel they are providing for a race.

At any time, FIA inspectors can request a sample from the fueling rig to compare the "fingerprint" of what is in the car during the race with what was submitted.

The teams usually abide by this rule, but in , Mika Häkkinen was stripped of his third-place finish at Spa-Francorchamps in Belgium after the FIA determined that his fuel was not the correct formula, as well as in , both McLaren and Penske cars were forced to the rear of the Italian Grand Prix after the octane number of the mixture was found to be too high.

The season saw the re-introduction of slick tyres replacing the grooved tyres used from to Unlike the fuel, the tyres bear only a superficial resemblance to a normal road tyre.

This is the result of a drive to maximize the road-holding ability, leading to the use of very soft compounds to ensure that the tyre surface conforms to the road surface as closely as possible.

Since the start of the season, F1 had a sole tyre supplier. From to , this was Bridgestone, but saw the reintroduction of Pirelli into the sport, following the departure of Bridgestone.

Nine compounds of F1 tyre exist; 7 are dry weather compounds superhard, hard, medium, soft, super-soft, ultra soft and hypersoft while 2 are wet compounds intermediates for damp surfaces with no standing water and full wets for surfaces with standing water.

Three of the dry weather compounds generally a harder and softer compound are brought to each race, plus both wet weather compounds.

The harder tyres are more durable but give less grip, and the softer tyres the opposite. In the Bridgestone years, a green band on the sidewall of the softer compound was painted to allow spectators to distinguish which tyre a driver is on.

With Pirelli tyres, the colour of the text and the ring on the sidewall varies with the compounds. Generally, the three dry compounds brought to the track are of consecutive specifications.

Disc brakes consist of a rotor and caliper at each wheel. Carbon composite rotors introduced by the Brabham team in are used instead of steel or cast iron because of their superior frictional, thermal, and anti-warping properties, as well as significant weight savings.

The driver can control brake force distribution fore and aft to compensate for changes in track conditions or fuel load. Regulations specify this control must be mechanical, not electronic, thus it is typically operated by a lever inside the cockpit as opposed to a control on the steering wheel.

When braking from higher speeds, aerodynamic downforce enables tremendous deceleration: This contrasts with 1. During a demonstration at the Silverstone circuit in Britain, an F1 McLaren-Mercedes car driven by David Coulthard gave a pair of Mercedes-Benz street cars a head start of seventy seconds, and was able to beat the cars to the finish line from a standing start, a distance of only 3.

As well as being fast in a straight line, F1 cars have outstanding cornering ability. Grand Prix cars can negotiate corners at significantly higher speeds than other racing cars because of the intense levels of grip and downforce.

Cornering speed is so high that Formula One drivers have strength training routines just for the neck muscles. The principal consideration for F1 designers is acceleration , and not simply top speed.

Three types of acceleration can be considered to assess a car's performance:. All three accelerations should be maximised.

The way these three accelerations are obtained and their values are:. However the massive power cannot be converted to motion at low speeds due to traction loss and the usual figure is 2.

The figures are for the Mercedes W The acceleration figure is usually 1. There are also boost systems known as kinetic energy recovery systems KERS.

These devices recover the kinetic energy created by the car's braking process. They store that energy and convert it into power that can be called upon to boost acceleration.

There are principally two types of systems: Electrical systems use a motor-generator incorporated in the car's transmission which converts mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa.

Once the energy has been harnessed, it is stored in a battery and released at will. When extra power is required, the flywheel is connected to the car's rear wheels.

In contrast to an electrical KERS, the mechanical energy does not change state and is therefore more efficient.

There is one other option available, hydraulic KERS, where braking energy is used to accumulate hydraulic pressure which is then sent to the wheels when required.

The carbon brakes in combination with tyre technology and the car's aerodynamics produce truly remarkable braking forces. In , Martin Brundle , a former Grand Prix driver, tested the Williams Toyota FW29 Formula 1 car, and stated that under heavy braking he felt like his lungs were hitting the inside of his ribcage, forcing him to exhale involuntarily.

Here the aerodynamic drag actually helps, and can contribute as much as 1. There are three companies who manufacture brakes for Formula One.

This means carbon fibres strengthening a matrix of carbon, which is added to the fibres by way of matrix deposition CVI or CVD or by pyrolysis of a resin binder.

The callipers are aluminium alloy bodied with titanium pistons. Titanium pistons save weight, and also have a low thermal conductivity, reducing the heat flow into the brake fluid.

The aerodynamic forces of a Formula 1 car can produce as much as three times the car's weight in downforce. At low speeds, the car can turn at 2.

The large downforce allows an F1 car to corner at very high speeds. Top speeds are in practice limited by the longest straight at the track and by the need to balance the car's aerodynamic configuration between high straight line speed low aerodynamic drag and high cornering speed high downforce to achieve the fastest lap time.

On low-downforce circuits greater top speeds were registered: This record was broken at the Mexican Grand Prix by Williams driver Valtteri Bottas, whose top speed in race conditions was Bottas had previously set an even higher record top speed during qualifying for the European Grand Prix , recording a speed of This top speed is yet to be confirmed by any official method as currently the only source of this information is the Williams team's Twitter post, [32] while the FIA's official speed trap data measured Bottas's speed at The car was optimised for top speed with only enough downforce to prevent it from leaving the ground.

In an effort to reduce speeds and increase driver safety, the FIA has continuously introduced new rules for F1 constructors since the s.

These rules have included the banning of such ideas as the "wing car" ground effect in ; the turbocharger in these were reintroduced for ; active suspension and ABS in ; slick tyres these were reintroduced for ; smaller front and rear wings and a reduction in engine capacity from 3.

Yet despite these changes, constructors continued to extract performance gains by increasing power and aerodynamic efficiency. As a result, the pole position speed at many circuits in comparable weather conditions dropped between 1.

In , the FIA further strengthened its cost-cutting measures by stating that gearboxes are to last for 4 Grand Prix weekends, in addition to the 2 race weekend engine rule.

These ECUs have placed restrictions on the use of electronic driver aids such as traction control, launch control and engine braking.

The emphasis being on reducing costs as well as placing the focus back onto driver skills as opposed to the so-called 'electronic gizmos' mainly controlling the cars.

Changes were made for the season to increase dependency on mechanical grip and create overtaking opportunities - resulting in the return to slick tyres, a wider and lower front wing with a standardized centre section, a narrower and taller rear wing, and the diffuser being moved backwards and made taller yet less efficient at producing downforce.

Overall aerodynamic grip was dramatically reduced with the banning of complex appendages such as winglets, bargeboards and other aero devices previously used to better direct airflow over and under the cars.

Due to increasing environmental pressures from lobby groups and the like, many have called into question the relevance of Formula 1 as an innovating force towards future technological advances particularly those concerned with efficient cars.

The FIA has been asked to consider how it can persuade the sport to move down a more environmentally friendly path.

Therefore, in addition to the above changes outlined for the season, teams were invited to construct a KERS device, encompassing certain types of regenerative braking systems to be fitted to the cars in time for the season.

The system aims to reduce the amount of kinetic energy converted to waste heat in braking, converting it instead to a useful form such as electrical energy or energy in a flywheel to be later fed back through the engine to create a power boost.

However unlike road car systems which automatically store and release energy, the energy is only released when the driver presses a button and is useful for up to 6.

It however made a return for the season , with all teams except HRT , Virgin and Lotus utilizing the device.

An additional electric motor-generator unit may be connected to the turbocharger. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For a summary of the technical and sporting regulations of Formula One racing, see Formula One regulations.

This article or section appears to be slanted towards recent events. Please try to keep recent events in historical perspective and add more content related to non-recent events.

November Learn how and when to remove this template message. With the exception of the driver adjustable bodywork described in Article 3.

Any device or construction that is designed to bridge the gap between the sprung part of the car and the ground is prohibited under all circumstances.

No part having an aerodynamic influence and no part of the bodywork, with the exception of the skid block in 3.

With the exception of the parts necessary for the adjustment described in Article 3. Air ducts around the front and rear brakes will be considered part of the braking system and shall not protrude beyond: This tangent continuous curve may not contain any radius less than 10mm.

All measurements will be made with the wheel held in a vertical position. Site is updated daily with news from F1 word. A bible for racing lovers. News from all around the word.

Unfortunately, to get access to all news, interviews and to open the site completely you should be subscribed to Autosport magazine.

Joe is an journalist, who write primarily about politics in and around motorsport, specifically on the FIA Formula 1 World Championship.

Site is relatively new, but great fun, with great discussion forum , Formula 1 news and forum. Biased toward British teams, but anyway good read.

You can learn a lot from this site. Pictures, cars and many many more. Enjoy range of Podcasts and Articles on Motorsport.

Top Speed Formel 1 Video

F1 Top Speed Baku City Circuit Azerbaijan

Top speed formel 1 -

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